Journal Highlights

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in these materials are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  • Medicinal Plants: A Public Resource for Metabolomics and Hypothesis Development. ABSTRACT: Medicinal Plant Metabolomics Resource (MPM) [1] provides a framework for generating experimentally testable hypotheses about the metabolic networks that lead to the generation of specialized compounds, identifying genes that control their biosynthesis and establishing a basis for modeling metabolism in less studied species. The database is publicly available and can be used by researchers in medicine and plant biology.
  • Development and characterization of a vector set with regulated promoters for systematic metabolic engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ABSTRACT: A set of vectors was constructed that enable combined and systematic testing of metabolic pathway genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The vectors are available as CEN/ARS and 2 µ-based plasmids with a choice of three inducible promoters, P(GAL1) , P(CUP1) and P(ADH2) . These features offer control over the initiation and level of gene expression. In addition, the vectors can be used as templates to generate PCR fragments for targeted chromosomal integration of gene expression cassettes. Selection markers are flanked by loxP elements to allow efficient CreA-mediated marker removal and recycling after genomic integration. For each promoter, expression of a bacterial lacZ reporter gene was characterized from plasmid-based and integrated chromosomal cassettes, and compared to that of the glycolytic P(PGK1) promoter. Plasmid stabilities were also determined. The promoters showed distinct activity profiles useful for modulating expression of metabolic pathway genes. This series of plasmids with inducible promoters extends our previous vector set carrying the constitutive promoters P(PGK1) , P(TEF1) and P(HXT7-391) .
  • Catalysis for the Conversion of Biomass and Biomass Derived Products. SUMMARY: This book is aimed at students and scientists in the interdisciplinary field of catalysis for an introduction to the emerging field of biomass conversion and an overview on recent developments and challenges. The papers are based on lectures presented by the authors at a summer school organized by the Fritz-Haber-Institut and held in August 2010 at Kloster Seeon in Germany in the framework of the National Science Foundation-funded program Partnership in International Research and Education: Molecular Engineering for the Conversion of Biomass Derived Reactants to Fuels, Chemicals, and Materials.

 

 

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in these materials are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.